Corey Davis’ route running makes him the best wide receiver in the draft

A little known prospect out of Wheaton, Illinois, Corey Davis did not receive many offers from FBS programs. Poor grades and a bad home situation made many recruiters wary at the collegiate level. In his senior year, he worked hard to become academically eligible and four years later, he broke the FBS record for most career receiving yards while at Western Michigan University.

Excellent route-running and underrated elusiveness packaged in a good build make him my number one receiving prospect in this year’s draft class. In the NFL, he has day one starting ability as an split end receiver and the versatility to be an immediate asset to any offense.

In college, he gained separation using crisp route-running with the understanding how to use head fakes, tight footwork, and a great ability to drop his hips to shift in space. With someone of his route running ability, he was able to create separation for his quarterback to sling him the ball on any route over the field.

His one big negative is drops. He had 16 over his last three years at Western Michigan. Personally, I think it’s a concentration issue from the time the ball hits his hands to him making the first move before he fully secures it.

From a pro comparison standpoint, Jordy Nelson from the Green Bay Packers fits him the best in my opinion. Both were savvy route runners coming out of college and both had underrated athleticism that attacked balls well in the air.

Similar to my Mike Williams’ and John Ross’ articles, the Seattle Seahawks don’t need a wide receiver. However, if Corey Davis falls to the 26th pick, I would definitely consider drafting him since I personally have a mid-first round grade on him. Outside of the Seahawks, the Baltimore Ravens with Joe Flacco could use another wide receiver, the Buffalo Bills with Sammy Watkins, and the Arizona Cardinals could all use a wide receiver of his skill set as well.

Samuel Gold

<p>Sam founded NFL Breakdowns after working his way through the journalist farm system and is enjoying life in the big league. Growing up outside of Washington, D.C., Sam didn’t choose the Redskins, the Redskins chose him. Out of a love for the game and an insatiable curiosity to determine why his beloved team was underperforming, Sam turned to studying film in NFL Breakdowns.</p>